Meet the locals

With it being Big Garden Birdwatch last weekend in the UK, I felt I should introduce you to a couple of the local birds in the Keys. Not quite the same as the ones that hang off my birdfeeder at home, but fun to watch all the same.

Pelican Youngsters

These six brown pelicans are all non-breeding adults. You can tell that from their white necks and yellow heads. Breeding adults have a brown neck and youngsters are all the same colour.

The trouble is they don’t quite seem to have got the hint that they should be catching their own food. This gang of hooligans descend on the boat as soon as we tie up at the dock obviously hoping that they might get some scraps (and they usually do!).

Bubba the Heron

The next bird on the scene is Bubba the local great blue heron. He tends to rule the roost at the dock (way above the pelicans in the pecking order) and always gets preferential treatment when the fish are being gutted.

He’s been around for at least five years and manages to cope with incredibly large bits of fish. God knows how he manages to swallow them – but they all seem to disappear down that deceptively narrow neck (I think he must have hollow legs!).

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~ by Jane on February 3, 2008.

6 Responses to “Meet the locals”

  1. thats an amazing look into a beautiful part of the world. Great Blue Herons are such amazing birds!

  2. Allison. Thanks so much for visiting my site. Really glad you enjoyed your look at the Florida Keys – the herons are such great characters. Jane

  3. Always reminds me of “that joke”…

    What do BT and a Pelican have in common?
    (I’m sure you can work out the rest!)

  4. The Black Rabbit. Ha! Ha! Haven’t seen them do that yet! Jane

  5. Hard to imagine “wild” birds behaving like that – but then, we have the various gulls.

  6. Dragonstar. It’s funny, they are “tame” but “wild” if you know what I mean. They won’t actually let you get that close to them. It’s like they have just found a way of living “with” and “alongside” man quite happily… still catching wild fish but supplementing it with man’s extras. Bit like us feeding the foxes or hedgehogs.

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